Tag Archives for " Health "

Study Shows Aging Process Increases DNA Mutations

Study shows aging process increases DNA mutations in important type of stem cellAs it is in much of life, the aging process isn’t kind molecular and cellular neuroscience to an important type of stem cell that has great therapeutic promiseResearchers at the Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) and The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) who looked at the effect of aging on induced (iPSCs) found that genetic increased with the age of the donor who provided the source cells, according to study results published today by the journal Nature Biotechnology.The findings reinforce the importance of screening iPSCs for potentially harmful DNA mutations before using them for therapeutic purposes, said lead investigators Ali Torkamani, Ph.D., director of genome informatics at STSI, and Kristin Baldwin Ph.D., the study’s co-lead investigators and associate professor of molecular and cellular neuroscience at the Dorris Neuroscience Center at TSRI.

“Any time a cell divides, there is a risk of a mutation occurring. Over time, those risks multiply,” Torkamani said. “Our study highlights that increased risk of mutations in iPSCs made from older donors of source cells.”Researchers found that iPSCs made from donors in their late 80s had twice as many mutations among protein-encoding genes as stem cells made from donors in their early 20s.

That trend followed a predictable linear track paired with age with one exception. Unexpectedly, iPSCs made from blood cells donated by people over 90 years old actually contained fewer mutations than what researchers had expected. In fact, stem cells from those extremely elderly participants had mutation numbers more comparable to iPSCs made from donors one-half to two-thirds younger.Researchers said the reason for this could be tied to the fact that remaining in have been protected from mutations over their lifetime by dividing less frequently.

“Using iPSCs for treatment has already been initiated in Japan in a woman with age-related macular degeneration,” said paper co-author and STSI Director Eric Topol, M.D. “Accordingly, it’s vital that we fully understand the effects of aging on these cells being cultivated to treat patients in the future.”STSI is a National Institutes of Health-sponsored site led by Scripps Health in collaboration with TSRI. This innovative research partnership is leading the effort to translate wireless and genetic medical technologies into high-quality, cost-effective treatments and diagnostics for patients.

Of the 336 different mutations that were identified in the iPSCs generated for the study, 24 were in genes that could impair cell function or trigger tumor growth if they malfunctioned.How troublesome these mutations could be depends on how well the stem cells are screened to filter out the defects and how they are used therapeutically, Torkamani said. For example, cells made from iPSCs for a bone marrow transplant would be potentially dangerous if they contained a TET2 gene mutation linked to blood cancer, which surfaced during the study.

“We didn’t find any overt evidence that these mutations automatically would be harmful or pathogenic,” he said.For the study, researchers tapped three sources for 16 participant blood samples: The Wellderly Study, an ongoing STSI research project that is searching for the genetic secrets behind lifelong health by looking at the genes of healthy elderly people ages 80 to 105; the STSI GeneHeart Study, which involves people with coronary artery disease; and TSRI’s research blood donor program.

The iPSCs were generated by study co-authors Valentina Lo Sardo, Ph.D., and Will Ferguson, M.S., researchers in the TSRI group led by Baldwin.”When we proposed this study, we weren’t sure whether it would even be possible to grow iPSCs from the blood of the participants in the Wellderly Study, since others have reported difficulty in making these from aged patients,” Baldwin said. “But through the hard work and careful experiments designed by Valentina and Will, our laboratories became the first to produce iPSCs from the blood of extremely elderly people.”

Source…http://news360.com/article/382262662

More Young People Contracting 'Old-Age' Conditions Due To Sedentary Lifestyles

People in their 20s and 30s are being treated for varicose veins, knee joint problems and other conditions usually associated with old age.Bad postures and sedentary lifestyles have led to a rise in the number of younger people experiencing complaints such as back pain and haemorrhoids, according to analysis by Bupa Data from more than 60,000 medical procedures in 2015 was compiled by the private healthcare group. It found treatment traditionally offered to older generations was increasingly being sought by younger people, aged mainly between 25 and 45 – a shift it attributed to time spent sitting at desks, watching box sets and using smartphones and tablets.

Removal of Bad posture and sedentary lifestyles have been blamed for a rise in the number of young people seeking treatment for conditions traditionally associated with old age. Two of the most common procedures in the heart and circulatory diseases category for both 26 to 35-year-olds and 36 to 45-year-olds.“Haemorrhoid removal and treatment for varicose veins are procedures that people in this age group should not be encountering,” said Dr Steve Iley, Bupa’s medical director in a statement.“However, when you consider the amount of time young people now spend sat using their mobiles and tablets, streaming box sets or playing with the latest games console, you can see why these conditions are rising in this age group.”Among the five most common procedures for 36 to 45-year-olds were arthroscopic knee operations, a surgical technique by which a tiny camera is used to look inside the knee.

Epidural injections at the base of the spine, used to treat back pain, was also in the top five for this age group – a 10 per cent rise from 2014, a Bupa spokesperson told The Independent.And arthroscopic knee operations were even one of the five most common procedures among 16 to 25-year-olds. Searches for stress-related conditions on Bupa’s website had also increased, it said, suggesting this could be due to longer working hours, busy schedules and a lack of ability to “switch off”.

Experts have warned that repeatedly looking down at mobile phones and other devices has led to a rise in the number of young people experiencing back and neck pain.Among 16 to 24-year-olds, 45 per cent said they were currently living with neck or back paincompared to 28 per cent of 18 to 24-year-olds asked the previous year, according to a survey by the British Chiropractic Association (BCA).Tim Hutchful, a BCA chiropractor, said he was “concerned that the number of patients under the age of 30 coming through our doors is increasing”.

“When people use laptops or mobile phones in bed they tend to forget their posture, hunch over the screen and leave their spine unsupported, which can damage posture and cause back or neck pain,” he said.Bupa said searches for “piles”, “IBS [Irritable bowel syndrome]” and stomach ulcers on its website had increased by up to 240 times in one year since 2014.

SOURCE… www.independent.co.uk

More Young People Contracting ‘Old-Age’ Conditions Due To Sedentary Lifestyles

People in their 20s and 30s are being treated for varicose veins, knee joint problems and other conditions usually associated with old age.Bad postures and sedentary lifestyles have led to a rise in the number of younger people experiencing complaints such as back pain and haemorrhoids, according to analysis by Bupa Data from more than 60,000 medical procedures in 2015 was compiled by the private healthcare group. It found treatment traditionally offered to older generations was increasingly being sought by younger people, aged mainly between 25 and 45 – a shift it attributed to time spent sitting at desks, watching box sets and using smartphones and tablets.

Removal of Bad posture and sedentary lifestyles have been blamed for a rise in the number of young people seeking treatment for conditions traditionally associated with old age. Two of the most common procedures in the heart and circulatory diseases category for both 26 to 35-year-olds and 36 to 45-year-olds.“Haemorrhoid removal and treatment for varicose veins are procedures that people in this age group should not be encountering,” said Dr Steve Iley, Bupa’s medical director in a statement.“However, when you consider the amount of time young people now spend sat using their mobiles and tablets, streaming box sets or playing with the latest games console, you can see why these conditions are rising in this age group.”Among the five most common procedures for 36 to 45-year-olds were arthroscopic knee operations, a surgical technique by which a tiny camera is used to look inside the knee.

Epidural injections at the base of the spine, used to treat back pain, was also in the top five for this age group – a 10 per cent rise from 2014, a Bupa spokesperson told The Independent.And arthroscopic knee operations were even one of the five most common procedures among 16 to 25-year-olds. Searches for stress-related conditions on Bupa’s website had also increased, it said, suggesting this could be due to longer working hours, busy schedules and a lack of ability to “switch off”.

Experts have warned that repeatedly looking down at mobile phones and other devices has led to a rise in the number of young people experiencing back and neck pain.Among 16 to 24-year-olds, 45 per cent said they were currently living with neck or back paincompared to 28 per cent of 18 to 24-year-olds asked the previous year, according to a survey by the British Chiropractic Association (BCA).Tim Hutchful, a BCA chiropractor, said he was “concerned that the number of patients under the age of 30 coming through our doors is increasing”.

“When people use laptops or mobile phones in bed they tend to forget their posture, hunch over the screen and leave their spine unsupported, which can damage posture and cause back or neck pain,” he said.Bupa said searches for “piles”, “IBS [Irritable bowel syndrome]” and stomach ulcers on its website had increased by up to 240 times in one year since 2014.

SOURCE… www.independent.co.uk

Eat Cheese, Live Longer

A recent study published in the journal Nature Medicine reported that eating cheese — specifically the aged kind containing the compound spermidine, as found in blue cheese — was linked to a longer life in mammals when tested on mice.

“The mice do not only live longer when we supplement spermidine to the drinking water, but they are also healthier in terms of cardiac function,” Frank Madeo, co-author of the study and a professor at the University of Graz in Austria, told Medical Daily.

The study observed 800 Italians and found that those who ate more cheese had lower blood pressure, a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and 40 percent lower risk of heart failure.

SOURCE…www.nypost.com

The Next Frontier of NFL Performance: Sleep

Imagine a conference championship game five or 10 years from now. The road team, having traveled to London and Las Vegas for its previous playoff games, arrives in Foxborough and engineers a shocking upset with the help of a surprising strategy: Even though the team’s quarterback is an All-Pro known for picking apart defenses, it employs a scaled-back, run-heavy game plan.

The head coach explains his daring tactical shift at the postgame press conference. “Well, Deshaun’s sleep hygiene has been terrible because of all our travel,” he says. “Our monitors recorded a 37 percent reduction in high-order decision-making because of poor sleep. Meanwhile, Ezekiel’s sleep hygiene has been great, speeding his recovery from that high ankle sprain. So we decided to pound the ball between the tackles.”

Coaching decisions based on sleep habits? Precision monitoring of players’ sleep and how it affects their health and performance? “Sleep hygiene?”

Does sleep even make that much of a difference, assuming a player got at least a little of it in the 48 hours before kickoff?

It turns out that sleep is the next frontier of NFL performance. Sports scientists around the world are studying it. Companies are designing new products to monitor it. Sleep is becoming the elite athlete’s secret weapon, and the NFL is just starting to discover how to harness its potential.

 

Learning the Language of Sleep

Gary McCoy, a sports science consultant for many NFL teams over the last few years, watched a pair of receivers sweat their way through a training camp session in 2015. One receiver was a celebrated veteran, the other a speedy young up-and-comer. Both wore high-tech sensors that monitored their heart rates, body temperatures and physical stresses during the intense practice. The sensors confirmed that the stress data for each receiver was roughly equal: Practice was just as hard for both of them.

But after practice, the veteran was ready for a full weight-room session. The younger player was gassed. If there was no difference in practice difficulty, shouldn’t it have been the other way around? McCoy realized that the sensors were missing an important aspect of athletic performance.

“We’re measuring stress,” he said. “But what’s more important is stress response.”

There is still a lot of mystery surrounding sleep. Sleep science is a new science. Until a few years ago, there were only two ways to monitor sleep: polysomnography, the expensive, cumbersome lab equipment that placed participants in uncomfortable and unfamiliar locations (thus immediately affecting their sleep patterns); or unreliable surveys of the I slept about eight hours last night, doc variety that had little chance of yielding precise results.

The rise of wearable wrist tech has revolutionized sleep study. Your everyday Fitbit provides a wealth of information, so much that your in-law can post their bad night’s sleep data on Facebook as a warning to everyone that she’s going to have a crabby day.

NFL teams are notoriously more secretive about their training programs and sports science initiatives. But they do exist.

WHOOP, the company for whom McCoy works, has developed wearable tech that includes a sophisticated sleep monitoring system that measures the length and quality of a night’s sleep and converts it into an easy-to-interpret quality score.

Another company selling sleep monitors to the NFL, Fatigue Science has developed the ReadiBand sleep tracker and SAFTE bio-mathematical fatigue model software in conjunction with the U.S. Army Research Lab and Johns Hopkins University. The system “translates all the complexity and nuance around a person’s sleep into a performance prediction,” according to sales director Jacob Fiedler.

The NFL and American team sports in general have been slow to join the sleep science revolution. Chip Kelly was well-known for his sleep science initiatives in Philadelphia, though he scrapped the monitoring program in favor of a voluntary reporting program last year. And while Fatigue Science officially consults with the Seattle Seahawks, most relationships between NFL teams and sleep-monitor vendors are off the record. B/R found, however, that at least a dozen teams have recently explored some kind of sleep monitoring program.

 

The quiet embrace of studying slumber is not new in sports, particularly on the international scene. Nick Littlehales was a mattress company executive consulting with Premier League superpower Manchester United several years ago to help players with chronic back pain (and, he hoped, secure a few endorsements). When he became a familiar face around team headquarters, the British soccer press (which can make the NFL media look like a litter of kittens) took notice.

“The paparazzi wrote: Those pampered Manchester United players have got a sleep coach who’s tucking them in and reading them bedtime stories,” Littlehales joked. “So I became the Sleep Coach by default.”

The laughs died down as other football clubs began investigating the link between sleep and performance. Sleep Coach Littlehales has performance monitors and bedding products for sale, but he also designs seminars for players, coaches and teams.

“Working with elite athletes, you have to define a language,” he said. “If you tell them you’re a sleep coach, they’ll run a mile. It’s not something they’re very interested in.”

One of the first terms athletes and teams learn in that new language is sleep hygiene, the habits that lead to healthy sleep, from limiting caffeine and alcohol intake to monitoring the temperature and humidity of the bedroom to scaling back on nighttime smartphone use. There is other not-too-familiar terminology to master, including circadian rhythms (the biological 24-hour cycles that dictate everything from brain wave activity to digestion) and polyphasic sleep (multiple naps instead of an eight-hour sleep session: important for soldiers, astronauts and athletes on crazy travel schedules).

Some NFL players are starting to speak the language. Fatigue Science’s products are the ones Richard Sherman cited in a guest Sports Illustrated column after the Seahawks won the Super Bowl in 2014. “We have specialized doctors who monitor us for concussion symptoms and wrist wear that helps the team track our sleep patterns,” Sherman wrote.

He added in a parenthetical aside: “In case you’re wondering, the sleep science has paid off for several guys.”

Sherman is not alone among players in embracing sleep science. “You’ve always heard you need eight hours of sleep, but you don’t know the science behind it all,” Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins told B/R in an offseason interview. “You don’t know until you’re taught the effect lack of sleep has upon your brain and its functionality. It changes completely when you’re sleep-deprived.” Jenkins includes a discussion of the importance of sleep to health and recovery as part of his youth football camps.

Star fitness trainer Brett Bartholomew, who has worked with Von Miller, Rob Gronkowski and others during the offseason, is on board with the sleep revolution. “Rest is a weapon,” he told Brad Stulberg of Outside Magazine. “What was once seen as a weakness is now a strength.” Bartholomew recommends massage and relaxing music, but “all of that stuff pales in comparison to sleep,” he says. “Just like you eat to support your training you need to sleep to support your training.”

In a 2015 feature for TheMMQB.com, Jenny Vrentas revealed that many NFL veterans are strict about their sleep routines, including Tom Brady, who has a 9 p.m. bedtime.

J.J. Watt is so dedicated to recovery science that he told Men’s Healthmagazine he naps in a flotation tank. “I love it. Sleep is something people overlook,” Watt says.

It sounds like a lot of technology, jargon and effort to emphasize something your grandma could have told you. But there is a lot more to sleep than just going to bed on time and waking up refreshed, especially for athletes who must travel coast-to-coast, sleep in unfamiliar hotels and make sure they are mentally and physically ready for kickoff.

 

Nature’s Performance Enhancer

When Dr. Shona Halson, senior recovery physiologist of the Australian Sports Commission, writes that “REM sleep is considered an activated brain inside a paralyzed body,” it sounds more like the stuff of horror movies than a natural, everyday (or every night) part of life.

More than the scary description, there are excellent reasons to rush toward a better understanding of sleep.

First, sleep disorders like apnea can be potentially life-threatening, they plague huge men (like football players), and they often go undetected by individuals who just think they “don’t sleep well.” Wrist monitors are not quite foolproof enough to diagnose a disorder, but they can point an athlete and his family, coaches or doctors toward a potential problem.

“A percentage of the whole adult population is dealing with something that has probably not been diagnosed or treated,” Fiedler said. “It can obviously have a huge impact on your life and health.”

Second, athletes who are too amped to sleep before and after the big game too often turn to pills. “A lot of times I go into an organization because the doctor was giving out 100 sleeping tablets every season, but now it’s up to a thousand'” Littlehales said. “And he wants to stop it.” A more scientific approach to sleep can lead athletes to better solutions.

Finally, and most excitingly, there’s sleep’s potential as what Halson calls a “natural performance enhancer.” Studies show that the body produces HGH while we sleep. Proper sleep doesn’t just make you more alert. It helps your body heal and grow. It can decrease recovery time for injuries and, like those receivers McCoy studied in training camp last year, it can increase offseason workout capacities.

There are also common-sense benefits to sleep that are still being quantified. Researchers have discovered that basketball players who take steps to improve their sleep habits become better free-throw shooters. Athletes who haven’t had enough sleep report increased fatigue and slower reactions. The WHOOP device calculates a cognitive marker to determine which players have had too little sleep to be of much use in the film room. “It can tell that this quarterback is ready for this level of cognitive information, but this one isn’t,” McCoy explained.

Still, the research is still in its infancy. The technology is still new, and no NFL players or international soccer stars are about to purposely go sleep-deprived before a big game or match in the name of science.

There is another impediment to the advancement of sleep science. The wearable tech may be too good, providing too much information to too many people too easily.

All the experts agree that there’s little good that can come from the rookie quarterback who checks his monitor the morning of the big game, realizes his night’s sleep was horrible and ends up with one more thing to worry about. For now, that isn’t an issue. The various devices being marketed to NFL teams will only send information to the team the night before kickoff, not the player himself.

But that raises another potential problem: how much information about the player’s sleeping habits should a team have access to? The issue translates easily into our own lives. How much information about your bedroom habits—bedtime, heart rate changes, respiration changes, body temperature changes, think about it—do you want your boss to have access to?

Wait … forget the boss. “The last thing we want is a player’s wife to get access to this information and ask: ‘Why weren’t you recovered for those two days you were on the road?'” McCoy acknowledged.

 

Little Interventions

Concerns over the scope of the information led the NFL Players Association to file a grievance regarding sleep monitors last October, stating that “because the use of such technology occurs outside of games and practice, we believe such use violates the Collective Bargaining Agreement.” Basically, the NFLPA contends that while teams have the right to monitor all sorts of body functions during practice, that right does not extend into the player’s bedroom.

The grievance was quietly settled over the summer. Teams can institute roster-wide monitoring as long as they receive NFLPA consent for the program. The Seahawks are currently the only team openly using sleep monitors on a roster-wide basis, as the New York Times‘ Ken Belson reported Saturday.

The policy change reflects both technological advancementss and the increased acceptance of wearable tech in the marketplace in recent years.

The makers of wearable tech understood the potential privacy concerns and created safeguards to resolve them. WHOOP doesn’t make the “granular” data available to the team, just a Recovery Score that places the night’s sleep into green-yellow-red categories. “They really don’t want to monitor your in-bed activities,” McCoy said.

Fiedler points out that the collective bargaining agreement was written back in 2011, when no one would have imagined everyday consumers wearing a Fitbit on their morning jogs. “Largely, they were uninformed about what data is actually being collected and how it’s being used, and what safeguards are in place to protect the players’ privacy,” he said of the resistance to team-wide monitoring.

The fear that the minute-by-minute bedroom events in the life of (let’s say) Rob Gronkowski might wind up in the hands of Roger Goodell or TMZ.com will keep the NFLPA on guard. There are also plenty of old-school coaches who scoff at the notion of newfangled “sports science” offering anything the fellas couldn’t get from good ol’ free weights and medicine balls.

But the gizmos are really only a small part of the full sleep science picture. “It’s about education,” Littlehales said. “It’s about raising awareness. It’s about techniques. It’s about little interventions.”

Littlehales’ seminars focus on teaching athletes to think of sleep in terms of cycles, not hours. Typically, a person goes through five cycles of different kinds of sleep (light, deep, REM) in eight hours. Instead of striving for eight hours per night, athletes and their coaching staffs can aim for 35 cycles per week, counting naps.

So, say a team like the Seahawks faces a playoff schedule that takes them from Seattle to Minneapolis to Seattle to Charlotte. Between long flights, jet lag, unfamiliar hotels and pre- and postgame adrenaline, eight-hour nights of sleep might be rare. But coaches can alter practice schedules and require nap periods, while players can learn how to better control their sleep patterns by monitoring caffeine intake, doing a little midnight yoga and so forth.

“They need to look at sleep in a polyphasic way,” Littlehales said. “They have to put their sleep in at different times to meet their schedules.”

Athletes who buy into sleep science quickly develop better habits. McCoy’s research of international athletes who used sleep monitors and learned some sleep hygiene basics revealed that they slept an extra 41 minutes per night on average, reduced their alcohol intake 70 percent and reduced their caffeine intake 60 percent. “It was mind-blowing,” McCoy said.

It’s a sign of the times that the one behavior that budged the least is the use of electronic devices, which have become the 21st century’s sneakiest sleep thieves. Coffee and booze proved easier to quit than late-night Twitter or Call of Duty. Still, sleep monitoring decreased electronic usage by 20 percent, according to the research.

Elite athletes can begin to strive for an excellent sleep score the same way they seek improvements on the track or in the weight room. “For the athletes that want it and embrace it, it’s something tangible,” Fiedler said of sleep science. “They get so many things thrown at them during the days and weeks of the preseason and the regular season. There’s something to the logic of providing them the right information in the right way.”

Teach a football player how and why to sleep better, and he will sleep better, whether his nighttime heart rates stream directly to Jerry Jones’ laptop or not. And once he’s sleeping better, he will start thinking better, recovering better and performing better.

Littlehales can foresee a scenario in which coaches use sleep analysis to make strategic decisions. “The captain’s got to be out there leading the team. But at the moment, he’s at 70 percent recovery. He’s also a night person, and this game is kicking off at night. What we need is a set of things in place so we don’t expose it,” Littlehales theorized.

In the meantime, NFL players and coaches are learning the language of sleep. Once they do, it’s on the field where the effect of sleep science will be most obvious and dramatic.

“The superhumans are still in our sports, McCoy said. “We’re just going to find out how superhuman they are.”

SOURCE…www.bleacherreport.com

Nutrition As Medicine

Most people truly do not understand the concept of nutritional medicine and fewer yet understand the concept of cellular nutrition.  This article will give you a better understanding of how I approach my patients as a specialist in Nutritional Medicine. Hopefully, this will give you a better understanding of how and why you can better protect your health or even regain your health by applying these concepts to your own life.

Concept of Oxidative Stress

Even though oxygen is necessary for life itself, it is inherently dangerous for our existence.  In the process of utilizing oxygen within your cells to create energy, you also create a by-product referred to as free radicals.  Free radicals are charged oxygen molecules that are missing at least one electron and desire to get an electron from the surrounding area.  If it is not readily neutralized by an antioxidant, which has the ability to give this free radical the electron it desires, it can go on to create more volatile free radicals, damage the cell wall, vessel wall, proteins, fats, and even the DNA nucleus of the cell.  So the same process that turns a cut apple brown or rusts metal is causing you to rust inside.  In fact, the medical literature now shows us that over 70 chronic degenerative diseases are the result of this process.  Diseases like coronary artery disease, cancer, diabetes, Parkinson’s, arthritis, macular degeneration, MS, lupus, among others are the result of small oxidative changes that occur over a long period of time.

It is all about Balance

The number of free radicals you produce is not steady.  In other words, some days you produce more than others.  Because of our stressful lifestyles, polluted environment, and over-medicated society, this generation must deal with more free radicals than any previous generation that has ever walked the face of the earth.  If you want to prevent oxidative stress, you need to have more antioxidants available along with their supporting nutrients than the number of free radicals you produce.  You see, we are not defenseless against this process.  Antioxidants are the answer.  The question is whether or not we are able to get all the antioxidants we need from our food.  This was the question I had to answer for myself and the reason that I wrote my book What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know about Nutritional Medicine.   After spending over 2 years reviewing the medical literature, I concluded that the only way you have a chance of preventing oxidative stress is by taking high quality, complete and balanced nutritional supplements that provide, what I refer to as, cellular nutrition.  If you have not read my book or listened to any of my CD’s on this subject, I would certainly encourage you to do just that.  The medical references are detailed in my books and provide the medical evidence that demands a verdict—should you be taking nutritional supplements?

History of Nutritional Medicine

            Over the past half century, nutritional medicine has been practiced with the belief that you had to determine what nutrients in which you were deficient and then supplement that particular nutrient.  It became very obvious to me early on in my research that the underlying problem most of us are facing is not a nutritional deficiency, but instead, the result of oxidative stress.  It was also apparent to me that medication, which actually increases the production of free radicals, would never be the answer to preventing any of these diseases.  Also if this was the case, the goal had to be to provide the nutrients that were necessary to build up our body’s natural antioxidant defense system so that you did not develop oxidative stress.  It became so apparent to me that our bodies, not the drugs I could prescribe, were the best defense against developing any of these diseases.  The problem is NOT a nutritional deficiency.  The problem is oxidative stress.

Modern Nutritional Research

Today’s research is focused on trying to find the magic bullet in regards to a particular disease.  For example, there were many studies that showed that those smokers who had the highest antioxidant levels in their blood stream had a significantly lower risk of developing lung cancer than those smokers who had the lowest level of antioxidants.  Most of the researchers felt that it was primarily due to the high levels of beta carotene.  So they decided to do a study and supplement a large number of smokers with just beta carotene.  They were dismayed when they found that the group that received the beta carotene alone actually had a higher incidence of lung cancer than the control group.  This led researchers and the media to actually claim that beta carotene was dangerous and should not be taken in supplementation in smokers.  A review of the same data reported a couple of years later showed that those smokers who had the highest levels of total antioxidants in their blood stream had a significantly decreased risk of developing lung cancer compared to those who had the lowest levels of antioxidants.

Beta carotene is NOT a drug.  It is merely a nutrient that we get from our food; however, because of supplementation we are now able to get it at levels you cannot obtain from your food.  Beta carotene works in only certain parts of the body and against only certain kinds of free radicals.  Beta carotene needs the other antioxidants along with the antioxidant minerals and B cofactors in order to do its job effectively.  However, researchers are focused on trying to find the magic bullet instead of stepping back and understanding the basic principles and concepts of cellular nutrition.  The amazing thing is how so many of these studies that look at just one or possibly two nutrients actually show a health benefit.  What would the health benefit be if you would put all of these nutrients together at these optimal levels?  Enter in the concept of cellular nutrition.

Concept of Cellular Nutrition

There are over 180 epidemiologic studies (studies that involve a very large number of people) that all show the very same thing.  Those individuals who have the highest levels of total antioxidants in their body compared with those who have the lowest levels have a 2- to 3-fold decrease risk of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and even Alzheimer’s dementia.  Obviously, those individuals who consume more of the fresh fruits and vegetables, which contain a large amount of these antioxidants, had the highest levels of antioxidants in their body.  This only makes logical sense when you understand the concept of oxidative stress as being the root cause of over 70 of these chronic degenerative diseases.  Therefore, a physician would conclude the best thing that they could advise their patients to do is to be consuming at least 8 to 12 servings of fresh whole fruits and vegetables each and every day.  The second best thing would be to recommend high quality, complete and balanced nutritional supplements that provided cellular nutrition.

Cellular nutrition would be defined as providing ALL of the micronutrients to the cell at these optimal or advanced levels that have been shown to provide a health benefit in our medical literature.  In other words, you would want your supplementation to be balanced and complete, much like a healthy diet is. The only difference is the fact that, unlike today’s food supply, supplementation can provide all of these nutrients at optimal levels.  We all need to be supplementing a healthy diet; however, because of our stressful lifestyles, polluted environment, and over-medicated society we do need to be supplementing.

Cellular nutrition has been shown in our medical literature to build up our body’s natural immune system, antioxidant system, and repair system.  You not only replenish any nutritional deficiency within 6 months of supplementation, but you also optimize all of the body’s micronutrients.  You are given the absolute best chance to reverse or prevent any oxidative stress and protect your health.  You see, nutritional supplementation is really about health—not disease.  Nutritional supplements are natural to the body and the nutrients the body requires to function at its optimal level.

Every man, woman, and child needs to be supplementing a healthy diet and be involved in a modest exercise program.  This is the key to protecting and maintaining your health.  However, what if you have already lost your health and have developed one of these chronic degenerative diseases?  Does supplementation provide any hope?  This is the question that I had to answer for myself and for my patients.  This has been the focus of my practice for the past 11 years and why I have developed my online practice located at www.raystrand.com.

The Concept of Synergy

The medical literature had showed me over and over again that those patients who were already suffering from a chronic degenerative disease like rheumatoid arthritis, MS, or diabetes actually had significantly more oxidative stress than the normal, healthy patient.  Cellular nutrition is generally adequate to help someone who is in excellent health; however, it would not be enough supplementation to bring oxidative stress under control in someone who is already suffering from a major disease.

It became very apparent to me early on that if you were going to be able to have any effect on improving the health of someone who was already suffering from cancer, heart disease, macular degeneration, diabetes, macular degeneration, and the like that you would have to truly optimize every aspect of the body’s natural defense systems.  I quickly began to realize that by placing all of my patients on basic cellular nutrition, I was able to create a synergistic effect.  Vitamin E is a great antioxidant within the cell membrane.  Vitamin C is a great antioxidant within the plasma.  Glutathione is the best intracellular antioxidant.  However, all of these antioxidants needed the antioxidant minerals and B cofactors to do their job well.  Also, vitamin C was able to replenish vitamin E so it could be used over and over again.  Alpha lipoic acid, another great antioxidant, was able to regenerate both vitamin E and glutathione.  I found that 1 plus 1 was no longer 2, but instead, 8 or 10. This powerful approach allowed me a much better chance of bringing oxidative stress back under control.

Once my patients were consuming my recommendations of cellular nutrition, I simply began adding enhancers to their nutritional supplement regime.  I began looking for the most potent antioxidants that were available.  Grape seed extract was found to be 50 times more potent than vitamin E and 20 times more potent than vitamin C at handling oxidative stress.  CoQ10 was not only a very important antioxidant but has been found to significantly boost our natural immune system and help provide increased energy for the cell to function at its optimal level.  Other nutrients like glucosamine sulfate, saw palmetto, phytonutrients, additional vitamin E, calcium, magnesium in various illnesses produced amazing results.

Over the past 12 years, I have learned how to best support my patients’ natural defenses and allow them the best chance to take back control of their health.  Again, it is all about balance.  I want my patients who are already suffering from an illness to also bring oxidative stress back under control.  This is my entire goal.  Then and only then do they have a chance to see their health improve.  By combining cellular nutrition with specific enhancers, I give all my patients the best chance of bringing oxidative stress back under control.  The results that I have seen in my medical practice using these principles have been nothing short of amazing and something that I had never witnessed in my first 20 plus years of medical practice.

Now, I want to share a couple of precautions that I have learned along the way.  First, nutritional medicine is not like taking drugs.  It takes a minimum of 6 months to build up the body’s natural defenses and many of my patients did not even begin to see any improvements in their health until after 6 months.  Not everyone responds to my recommendations; however, I feel the majority of my patients have had significant health improvements when they followed these recommendations.  None of my patients were cured of their underlying illness.  Nutritional supplementation is not an alternative or substitute for traditional medical care.  You should never quit taking any medication prescribed by your doctor without his or her consent and direction.  Many of my patients have been able to decrease their dependence of medication and in some cases even discontinue some of their medication.  However, this is always because of a significant positive improvement in their health and under the direction of their personal physician.

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCE…www.raystrand.com

This Is What Happens When You Drink Only Water For 30 Days

The body—each molecular cell, tissue, and organ—relies upon water to remain alive and workable. Water provides a kind of health therapy, along with sustaining your life. It greatly impacts specific body operations and the maintenance of good health.

When you only drink water as your primary beverage, outstanding things can happen. Undertaking a special water regimen is not easily achievable for some, but positive consequences are possible. Here’s what can happen when you drink only water for 30 days, without changing your diet or exercise routine.

 

Your mental creativity and performance will be boosted

When you drink only water for 30 days, your brain reacts faster, according to the Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Journal. As the brain needs tons of oxygen to operate efficiently, and water is one of the great sources, your brainpower will be boosted. It helps you think and help you focus. Also it makes you keen, clever, and quick. Ingesting 8 to 10 cups of water per day can improve your cognitive performance by as much as 30%.

 

You’ll age more slowly than your peers

Drinking water helps decelerate the aging process by keeping your skin adequately hydrated. It moisturizes your skin, keeps it healthy, soft, plump, glowing, youthful, and wrinkle-free. It helps maintain muscle tone, also. To realize these benefits, you must drink pure water.

In an article published by the Daily Mail, a 42-year-old mother managed to make herself appear 10 years younger in 30 days by drinking only water. She started by drinking three liters of water a day to overcome her long-standing headaches and poor digestion dilemma. After only one month, she was absolutely stunned by the spectacular results. Both of her problems were resolved, and she fully recovered from the effects of chronic dehydration.

She announced, “I genuinely can’t believe the difference in my face. I look like a different woman. The dark shadows around my eyes have all but disappeared and the blotches have gone. My skin is almost as dewy as it was when I was a child. The transformation is nothing short of remarkable… I’m feeling leaner and fitter, too, which is amazing, since the only thing I’ve changed is the amount of water I drink.”

Your immunity will be strengthened

A Slovakian Proverb says “Pure water is the world’s first and foremost medicine.”

That is no exaggeration! Water behaves as a catalyst for the renewal of optimal body functions. Drinking adequate amounts of water supports the performance of your liver and kidneys. These organs eliminate toxic substances, waste, and salt from your blood.

FullFitSure asserts that sufficient water consumption neutralizes pH levels, strengthens your immunity against kidney stones and other illnesses, and supports pain management (body aches and headaches), too.

You’ll have a stronger heart

Water helps you become heart healthy. It decreases the threat of a heart attack by preventing your blood from thickening, and by lowering your blood pressure.

One glass of water an hour before bed is said to prevent a heart attack or stroke. It makes it easier for the heart to send freshly oxygenated blood to the organs. The American Journal of Epidemiology published asix-year study that found that people who drank more than five glasses of water a day were 41% less likely to die from a heart attack than those who drank less than two glasses a day.

Your bones will be strengthened

Water helps rebuild shock absorber cartilage, so joints can move smoothly, curtailing joint damage triggered by tension. Testimonies give evidence that joint flexibility improves with adequate intake of water.

You’ll lose fat

When you drink only water for 30 days, your body removes irritable, harmful toxins and waste products from your vital organs. This makes your body cleaner and helps trim belly fat.

In the beginning, an increase in pounds could become a concern if your body is retaining water before adjusting to the higher intake consumption. Even so, acting as an appetite suppressant, water comes to the rescue. You’ll soon begin to consume fewer calories, lose weight, and keep it off, because the water flushes out your system, cleansing your body and reducing your hunger.

Andrea N. Giancoli, MPH, RD, and spokesperson for The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, submits that drinking one or two glasses of water before a meal can fill you up so you naturally eat less. Consuming water at regular intervals will assist with your weight management.

Your metabolism will be enhanced

Studies suggest that consistently drinking water during each day stimulates a more dynamic metabolism, regardless of your diet. Consuming 16 ounces of water just after awaking in the mornings raises your metabolism by 24%, according to the Health Fitness Revolution.

SOURCE...www.lifeghack.org

Sugar And High Fructose Corn Syrup Both Are The same… “Bad For Your Health!”

These two industries are literally both full of trash and not natural at all. In the below article we detail the battle between the two as they battle for   brain damaging and free radical supremacy as both destroy the body.

 

The sugar industry and high fructose corn syrup producers are meeting in a Los Angeles federal courtroom in their struggle over whether sugar and high fructose corn syrup are essentially the same. Corn refiners say that high-fructose corn syrup is natural and “nutritionally the same as table sugar.” A lawsuit brought by sugar processors’ say those statements are false. The trial is expected to last about three weeks.

In 2008, corn refiners launched an advertising campaign calling high fructose corn syrup “corn sugar.” The advertising also claimed that the body cannot tell the difference between the two. In 2011, the Western Sugar Cooperative and other sugar processors sued a group of corn refiners to stop the campaign. The corn refiners filed a countersuit arguing the sugar industry was pushing misinformation about high-fructose corn syrup to protect their market share. The sugar industry is seeking $1.5 billion in damages from the corn refiners. The corn refiners are seeking $530 million in damages from the sugar industry.

The advertising was described by the attorney for the corn refiners as an effort to combat falsehoods and junk science pushed by the sugar industry. Corn syrup producers say the sugar industry has been engaged in a campaign of misinformation for years. After high fructose corn syrup became commercially available in the 1970s, sugar began losing its hold on the sweetener market. Roughly 10 years ago, the sugar industry began pushing unsubstantiated claims about corn syrup being worse for health than sugar, according to the attorney.

According to the corn refiners’ position, both sugar and corn syrup are processed,with the only difference being that corn sugar is made from corn. The corn refiners claimed that the Sugar Association falsely claimed in its newsletter that corn syrup causes obesity and cancer. The outcome of the billion-dollar battle could have wide ranging effects on both the sugar industry and the high-fructose corn syrup industry. The case has been delayed by years of legal wrangling.

The Corn Refiners Association also complains that sugar growers benefit from generous U.S. government subsidies and they will be challenging sugar’s protected status with the help of a Washington lobbyist hired earlier this year. Both sugar and high-fructose corn syrup have been blamed for contributing to a host of health issues, ranging from diabetes and obesity to tooth decay. In 2004, a report by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition linked corn syrup to obesity. In 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ruled that high fructose corn syrup could not be called sugar.

 

 

 

READMORE…newsonwellness.com

Sugar And High Fructose Corn Syrup Both Are The same… "Bad For Your Health!"

These two industries are literally both full of trash and not natural at all. In the below article we detail the battle between the two as they battle for   brain damaging and free radical supremacy as both destroy the body.

 

The sugar industry and high fructose corn syrup producers are meeting in a Los Angeles federal courtroom in their struggle over whether sugar and high fructose corn syrup are essentially the same. Corn refiners say that high-fructose corn syrup is natural and “nutritionally the same as table sugar.” A lawsuit brought by sugar processors’ say those statements are false. The trial is expected to last about three weeks.

In 2008, corn refiners launched an advertising campaign calling high fructose corn syrup “corn sugar.” The advertising also claimed that the body cannot tell the difference between the two. In 2011, the Western Sugar Cooperative and other sugar processors sued a group of corn refiners to stop the campaign. The corn refiners filed a countersuit arguing the sugar industry was pushing misinformation about high-fructose corn syrup to protect their market share. The sugar industry is seeking $1.5 billion in damages from the corn refiners. The corn refiners are seeking $530 million in damages from the sugar industry.

The advertising was described by the attorney for the corn refiners as an effort to combat falsehoods and junk science pushed by the sugar industry. Corn syrup producers say the sugar industry has been engaged in a campaign of misinformation for years. After high fructose corn syrup became commercially available in the 1970s, sugar began losing its hold on the sweetener market. Roughly 10 years ago, the sugar industry began pushing unsubstantiated claims about corn syrup being worse for health than sugar, according to the attorney.

According to the corn refiners’ position, both sugar and corn syrup are processed,with the only difference being that corn sugar is made from corn. The corn refiners claimed that the Sugar Association falsely claimed in its newsletter that corn syrup causes obesity and cancer. The outcome of the billion-dollar battle could have wide ranging effects on both the sugar industry and the high-fructose corn syrup industry. The case has been delayed by years of legal wrangling.

The Corn Refiners Association also complains that sugar growers benefit from generous U.S. government subsidies and they will be challenging sugar’s protected status with the help of a Washington lobbyist hired earlier this year. Both sugar and high-fructose corn syrup have been blamed for contributing to a host of health issues, ranging from diabetes and obesity to tooth decay. In 2004, a report by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition linked corn syrup to obesity. In 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ruled that high fructose corn syrup could not be called sugar.

 

 

 

READMORE…newsonwellness.com

Post-Workout Behavior, Why It Matters

Do wonders for your workout.

Follow these after-exercise tips … Often, we feed the “fitness meter” its daily investment only to exit the Center and overcompensate for our healthy activity. Suddenly, we may feel entitled to eat that cheeseburger and fries, followed up with a couple hours on the couch watching mindless TV. Use your post-workout actions to enhance your fitness efforts. A healthy lifestyle goes beyond a daily exercise session. Follow these tips to maximize your fitness efforts:

EAT Well.

An intense workout does not justify a junk-food binge or even a big meal. We often assume we burned more calories than we actually did. An effective solution: Focus less on food’s calories and more on how much activity it actually takes to burn off that food. For example, a popular fast-food grilled chicken ranch BLT sandwich (approximately 440 calories) would take a 154-pound, 5’10” male about an hour of weightlifting to burn off. One post-workout indulgence can cancel the benefits of an entire fitness session. After your workout, keep the healthy vibe going with a nutritious snack or meal packed with the protein and carbs needed to replace essential nutrients used during exercise. Smart post-workout food choices also help the body recover better from the physical exertion expended—and increase your fitness success.

Rehydrate.

Water consumption is essential before, during, and after a workout. Experts suggest drinking 24 ounces of fluid for each pound lost during exercise. This can be determined by weighing yourself before and after a workout.

Drink beyond your thirst. Thirst is not always an accurate indicator of hydration. Monitor urine frequency and color to assure you are consuming enough fluids. After an intense or lengthy workout, consider a sports drink to replenish lost electrolytes as well.

 

Stretch.

Your future self will thank you a thousand times for stretching regularly, especially after exercise. Those who skip this essential part of their workout, including young athletes, live to regret it. The negative effects appear in joints and muscles later in life, causing everything from decreased range-of-motion to chronic aches.

Schedule 10 to 15 minutes at the end of your workout to complete a full-body stretch. Muscles will be warm and flexible then, allowing for easy, deep stretching. This post-workout habit helps prevent injuries, and maintains healthy joints and muscles. It also acts as an overall cooldown for the body, which helps the heart and circulatory system transition.

Keep Moving .

How we spend time beyond the workout has a significant impact on health and weight loss goals. Research continues to reveal the importance of movement throughout the day. Physical activity helps burn calories and improve overall health. Formal fitness is a positive and essential element of a healthy lifestyle. Yet, the benefits can be negated by sedentary habits the rest of the day.

Regular exercise definitely improves your health. However, avid exercisers can unintentionally increase their risk for heart disease, obesity, and other health issues by how they spend the rest of their waking hours. By staying mobile, you improve your health and continue to burn a bunch of calories beyond what you accomplish at the Center. Easy, ongoing movement also helps keep joints and muscles flexible.

Don’t sabotage your workout efforts. Complement them! Follow through fitness with the healthy habits your body deserves.

 

READMORE…Fitnessandwellnessnews.com